Telemedicine News Brief

ATA Telemedicine News Brief
The following news items come from the most recent edition of the ATA Telemedicine News Brief, a weekly email digest of the most important news in telemedicine, telehealth, mHealth and remote medical technology. Gathered from leading press sources and industry journals, the News Brief is your one sources for all the top news of the week.

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Apr 16, 2014
This year, the ATA Annual Meeting (May 17-20, Baltimore) will be attended by over 5,000 peers learning how they can take advantage of the opportunities ahead. Only by attending ATA 2014 will someone be able to hear of and benefit from the amazing transformation happening in our field. If you haven't done so already, be sure to register before the April 18 early-bird deadline to save $150. We look forward to seeing you there!
Apr 16, 2014
Maryland lawmakers have successfully expanded coverage of telemedicine-provided services under the state's Medicaid plan. The new law allows reimbursement for telemedicine-provided services comparable to that of in-person services for the Medicaid fee-for-service and managed care plans. The new law also authorizes the agency to determine the types of providers eligible for telemedicine reimbursement and whether or not to reimburse for store-and-forward and remote patient monitoring.
Apr 16, 2014
Tennessee is the 21st state to enact a statewide parity law for private insurance coverage of telehealth. The newly enacted law would require private insurers and the state’s Medicaid managed care plans to reimburse healthcare providers for services provided via video-conferencing and store-and-forward on the same basis as they would for in-person services. The law also prohibits private insurers from denying coverage of telehealth-provided services.
Apr 16, 2014
Dr. Joseph Kvedar writes, "It was 1999, and I was speaking at a prestigious academic center's 'Innovations in Dermatology' symposium. I presented work we had done on a Web application that would allow a non-dermatologist (primary-care doctor or other front-line provider) to upload images of a patient's skin as well as some history. Subsequently, a dermatologist could review both the history and the images and enter a diagnosis and recommendations on the same website. My talk was greeted with intense scorn by one audience member ('You are cheapening our specialty,' he told me) and general lack of enthusiasm by most of the others."
Apr 16, 2014
Mobile messaging as part of medical recovery treatment proves mHealth efforts can boost rehabilitation efforts for injured military personnel and help soldiers reintegrate following service, as shown in a recent pilot.
Apr 16, 2014
A Senate bill would increase the use of telemedicine in Florida and establish requirements for health providers who treat patients remotely. A companion bill is also making its way through the House, but that bill doesn't require doctors to have a Florida license — only that they be licensed in their home state and registered in Florida.
Apr 16, 2014
North Carolina leaders need to make sure both funding and new rules are in place to ensure a new statewide telepsychiatry program succeeds, according to a report by the North Carolina Center for Public Policy Research.
Apr 16, 2014
Teledentistry is a program for low-income patients in California who don't have access to regular dental care. Often they're stymied by high costs and a shortage of dentists who treat the poor. Many also face language barriers, lack legal immigration status, are afraid of dentists or have a poor understanding of what causes dental problems.
Apr 16, 2014
It's midnight, a child is running a high fever, and the hospital is a long way away. Instead of panicking and rushing him to the emergency room, his mother puts a device on his forehead that reads vital signs like Dr. Spock's tricorder on "Star Trek." The device sends the data to a physician via the Internet, and the mother receives her son's diagnosis. It's just a common cold, treatable with Tylenol, orange juice, and plenty of rest.
Apr 16, 2014
In an effort to enhance the overall content of the ATA Telemedicine News Brief, we'd like to include peer-written articles in future editions. As a member of ATA, your knowledge of the industry lends itself to unprecedented expertise. And we're hoping you'll share this expertise with your peers through well-written commentary. Because of the digital format, there's no word or graphical limit. Our group of talented editors can help with final edits. If you're interested in participating, please contact Ronnie Richard to discuss logistics.