Telemedicine News Brief

ATA Telemedicine News Brief
The following news items come from the most recent edition of the ATA Telemedicine News Brief, a weekly email digest of the most important news in telemedicine, telehealth, mHealth and remote medical technology. Gathered from leading press sources and industry journals, the News Brief is your one sources for all the top news of the week.

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Oct 16, 2014
The ability for state licensing boards to engage in anti-competitive rulemaking was argued before the U.S. Supreme Court today. The case, North Carolina Board of Dental Examiners v. Federal Trade Commission, involves a dental board - composed of dentists exclusively - arguing that only dentists can provide teeth-whitening services. The court’s decision could force states to change the composition of state licensing boards. It may also impinge on the power of state boards to use practice rules to limit economic competition and consumer choice. Read more about the case here.
Oct 16, 2014
ATA has partnered with Club Quarters, a network of full-service hotels designed for business travelers, to offer members low, fixed rates whether the destination city is full or not. Rates for ATA members start at $85/night. ATA Members may browse for hotels here. The password for ATA members is: ata.
Oct 16, 2014
Hear from thought leaders representing the world's most respected healthcare institutions address topics like hospital readmissions, public policy, emerging technologies, building sustainable telehealth networks and utilizing big data. Watch high-definition video and presentations on demand in the ATA Learning Center here.
Oct 16, 2014
The Internet can be a dangerous place to get medical advice. Stomachaches turn into cancer, stress becomes an endocrine tumor. Crack remedies and strange diets abound. Now Google is playing with a new technology that it hopes will help people find more reliable medical information. It’s called a doctor.
Oct 16, 2014
While 30 percent of online consumers would embrace a healthcare data service in exchange for lower healthcare costs, they want more out of the devices than just simple data, according to a new Decisions Resources Group research report. The Cybercitizen Health survey, conducted by the Manhattan Research Group, also notes 32 percent of the respondents said they are interested in using a wearable device to boost personal health, according to an announcement on the report.
Oct 16, 2014
The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs announced that 690,000 US veterans received care in the 2014 fiscal year via telehealth, with 2 million telehealth visits scheduled. That means that 12 percent of all veterans enrolled in VA programs received telehealth care of some kind in 2014.
Oct 16, 2014
Despite being separated by a big body of water and quite a few language barriers, there are few shared struggles in healthcare between the U.S. and Europe. An Economist article highlighting the rise of telemedicine in the European Union calls attention to the issue of reimbursement and implementation in its member countries.
Oct 16, 2014
The idea of telemedicine – healthcare provided using telecommunications equipment – has a lengthy history. Radio News, an American magazine, devoted its cover to a patient at home consulting a doctor in his surgery via a television link as long ago as 1924. When NASA began monitoring astronauts in space in the 1960s, fantasy became reality. It has been touted as healthcare's future ever since.
Oct 16, 2014
Delivery of care remotely with the use of telecommunications is a rapidly growing segment of the healthcare market. According to the American Telemedicine Association, there are about 200 telemedicine networks in the U.S., with 3,500 service sites. A host of private companies sell telemedicine services that offer around-the-clock access to physicians who can provide remote medical exams and prescribe medications.
Oct 16, 2014
As more and more healthcare providers embark on telehealth strategies, CIOs and IT departments are discovering that it's not as simple to set up and manage as originally expected. Many pilot efforts have failed due to poorly designed network connectivity, complicated clinical workflows, confusing technology user experiences, unreliable equipment and lack of ROI in terms of clinical outcomes or financial benefits. In some cases, these problems aren’t discovered until the systems have been rolled out and the negative results are felt firsthand by doctors and patients.